Hye-Won Hwang

Hye-Won Hwang

Hye-Won Hwang

Assistant Professor of Practice, Dance

Hye-Won Hwang earned a Ph.D. in Critical Dance Studies from the University of California, Riverside. She also holds an MA in Dance Studies from the Laban Center, London (now called Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music & Dance) and an MA in Dance Education from New York University. She received a BA in Dance at Ewha Woman’s University where she graduated magna cum laude. Dr. Hwang is also a certified movement analyst (CMA) and a certified yoga teacher.

Dr. Hwang joined the dance faculty at the Glenn Korff School of Music at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 2015, where she is now an Assistant Professor of Practice in Dance. She has taught Intermediate and Advanced Modern Dance Technique, Dance Composition and Dance History courses. She co-directed the annual Student Dance Project (2015) and created "(Un)bound" and "The Path Unknown" for the Evenings of Dance (2016 and 2017), the annual faculty and guest artist dance concert at Nebraska. Prior to joining the Dance Program at Nebraska, Dr. Hwang taught dance practice and theory courses at the University of California, Riverside (2013-2014).

As a dancer, she performed repertoires of classical ballet, modern and contemporary dance, Korean traditional dance, musical theater dance, and experimental dance with music and interactive technology at recognizable venues in Korea, Europe, and the United States. Recently, Dr. Hwang performed “Reset,” a modern dance piece as a part of Glenn Korff Day Celebration Performance (2016) and “Salpuri,” a Korean traditional dance, along with Hyeyung Yook playing the Bach’s G minor Adagio and Presto (2017) in Lincoln. The venues include the National Theater (Korea), Se-Jong Cultural Center (Korea), the Ailey Citigroup Theater (US), St. Mark’s Church (US), 92nd Street Y (US), Whitney Museum of American Art (US), Frederick Loewe Theater (US), the Johnny Carson Theater (US), Kimball Recital Hall (US), the Edinburgh Playhouse (UK), Casa Paganini (Italy), and Yugoslav Drama Theatre (Serbia). She also created a solo work, “The Wave of Moment” and performed it at St. Mark’s Church in-The-Bowery in New York City. The work was reviewed in The New York Times in 2005. As an improviser, Dr. Hwang collaborated with musicians, technicians, community artists, and dance department faculty members in the United States. In 2007 and 2008, she played an active role in stage-managing and assisting directors for Interactive Multimedia Performing Arts Collaborative Technology (IMPACT), Summer Study Abroad Program, organized by New York University.  

As a dance scholar, her research interests lie in the global circulation of dance and other bodily practices, linked to issues of body, gender, class, power relations, institutions, globalization, and identity. Dr. Hwang published several articles in scholarly journals, such as the International Journal of Cultural Policy, the Dance Research Journal of Korea, and the Korean Research Journal of Dance Documentation. She also contributed an article-length chapter to the anthology, Dance Theory: As Afterlives of Ephemeral Dance (2016), published by Ewha Woman’s University Press. In addition, she presented research papers and workshops at numerous scholarly meetings, including the 2017 Pacific Sociological Association Conference in Portland, the 2016 World Dance Alliance Asia Pacific Dance Festival and Conference in Seoul, the 2015 International Academic Symposium of the Dance Research Institute in Seoul, South Korea, the 2014 Society of Dance History Scholars/Congress on Research in Dance (SDHS/CORD) conference in Iowa, the 2013 Society of Dance History Scholars/Congress on Research in Dance (SDHS/CORD) conference in California, the 2013 Nordic Forum of Dance Research/Society of Dance History Scholars (NOFOD/SDHS) conference in Norway, the 2011 Society of Dance History Scholars (SDHS) conference in Canada, the 2006 National Dance Education Organization (NDEO) conference, the UC-wide graduate student conference “Dance Under Construction” (DUC) in 2010, and the 2008 NYU Arts Education conference.